Please Camp Responsibly. Take the CAMPER’S CODE Pledge

Bridge Lake Provincial Park Nestled in the Interlakes Region of British Columbia’s Cariboo

When planning a family camping trip for family stretching from Vancouver Island to the far north of BC, we recently settled on meeting in the middle, so to speak, and packed up for a week in the Cariboo.

Bridge Lake is one of many, many lakes in the Interlakes District, a region known for fishing. In fact, Highway 24, stretching from 100 Mile House to Little Fort, is often referred to as the Fishing Highway and Bridge Lake is situated smack dab in the centre.

Bridge Lake Provincial Park is quite large, at just over 400 hectares, and protects undeveloped shoreline and numerous islands within Bridge Lake itself. A small campground is located just three kilometres from the community of Bridge Lake at the south end of the lake. The Bridge Lake Provincial Park campground has 13 vehicle accessible campsites, and 3 “walk in” campsites right along the water, perfect for those willing to walk the extra 50 feet down the wide, well maintained trail.

Campsite at Bridge Lake Provincial Park, Cariboo | Kim Walker

As we were travelling with our tent trailer, we opted for one of the vehicle accessible campsites and were pleased to find our site to have a nice mix of sun and shade and lots of privacy. There is one set of outhouses in the campground loop, and one additional outhouse near the day use boat launch and walk in tenting area. There is no water available at the campsite as the previous well has been decommissioned, so it is important to plan ahead and either bring the water you need with you or be prepared to buy small bottles at one of the nearby general stores. Cell service was spotty in the campground, but several places in the park, including the boat launch, had improved reception.

Bridge Lake Boat Launch | Kim Walker

Bridge Lake Provincial Park campground is located on a little peninsula that sticks out into Bridge Lake. The peninsula is criss-crossed by trails, and it is easy to walk for a kilometre or two just by following the obvious trail leaving near campsite number three and then exploring the various trails that branch down to the water. Stick to the main path and eventually you will circle back to the boat launch and walk in camping area.

Kayaking on Bridge Lake in the Cariboo | Kim Walker

Bridge Lake is an excellent water destination. During our trip we spent lots of time exploring the bay near the boat launch by paddleboard. A short paddle out of the bay brought us to a white buoy marking an unexpected shallow spot where stacked boulders littered the lake bottom making the water in which we were paddling sometimes less than a foot deep. The rocks were a bit slippery, but with caution you can have your very own walking on water moment!

We Named it Seagull Island | Kim Walker

For those looking for a longer paddle, there are plenty of options as well. We explored the south-east portion of the lake’s shoreline as an 8 kilometre paddle which included several blue herons, lots of daydreaming about owning one of the many waterfront recreational properties, a stream flowing into the lake, and a number of small islands including one rocky outcrop that I nicknamed Seagull Island for obvious reasons.

A Sunset Paddle on Bridge Lake | Kim Walker

In true Cariboo form, our trip was complete with both spectacular sunsets and spectacular thunderstorms.

Throughout the course of our trip, it seems that the campsite had 3 or 4 vehicle accessible spaces that remained empty each night. That being said, the camper turnover was nearly 100%, and we had different campsite neighbours every night of our trip. My impression is that many people used Bridge Lake Provincial Park as a stopping off point between two other destinations, but having spent the better part of a week there, I still feel like we have only scratched the surface of what the region offers and we will certainly be back!

TIP: If you find this blog interesting why not subscribe to the enewsletter and never miss another story!

Check out the blog on the Bridge Lake Ice Caves! There is an excellent series of walking and hiking trails at the Recreation Site as well as beautiful views over Bridge Lake and the ice caves themselves are fascinating both geologically and historically.

For campgrounds in this area and elsewhere in British Columbia check out the Camping Map.

Share your BC travel and camping photos using hashtag #campinbc #explorebc

It’s always a great day to #CampInBC

Published: May 25th, 2023

Connect With Us