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Plan a Camping Trip to British Columbia’s Similkameen Valley

BC Parks reservations can be tricky to come by for a summer weekend, so when we snagged a last minute reservation for Stemwinder Provincial Park in BC’s Similkameen Valley we were excited to get out and try a new campsite.

Previously we have camped at nearby Bromley Rock Provincial Park (see our blog) so we had an idea of what the area would be like. The campsite at Stemwinder consists of 28 vehicle accessible campsites sandwiched between Highway 3 and the Similkameen River. The campground is generally laid out on two levels, the top level is right beside the highway and the sites are fairly open. The lower level, beside the river, is more treed. Our site was located right on the corner where you drive from the upper bench to the lower bench, so while it was surrounded on three sides by the campground road it still managed to be decently private since we really only had one neighbour.

Stemwinder Provincial Park | Kim Walker

The campsite at Stemwinder has pit toilets and one hand pump (on the lower level) for water. There are two short trails leading from near campsites 12 and 13 to access the river. Caution is advised, though, as Poison Ivy lurks just off the established trail! When we visited it was still quite early in the season and the Similkameen River was high. Later in the season the water would be lower and exploring the shoreline would be an option, although BC Parks cautions that the river runs fast and excellent swimming skills are required for anyone venturing into the water at this location. For a more relaxing swimming destination, head to Bromley Rock.

Riverside in Stemwinder Provincial Park | Kim Walker

Stemwinder Provincial Park makes an excellent location to use as a base to explore the surrounding area. On our trip, we spent our first day visiting nearby Keremeos. Keremeos offers a huge selection of orchards and vineyards. Pick up a winery and cidery passport at your first stop of the day, and then visit a total of either three or five locations in order to be entered to win a Similkameen Wine Lovers Package. On our visit we focused on the Similkameen cideries and had a great time visiting each location and sampling their offerings.

Our Campsite | Kim Walker

There are plenty of opportunities to travel back in time in Keremeos. The Red Bridge, originally built in 1907 as a railway bridge, is one of the only covered bridges left on the west coast. Keremeos Grist Mill and Gardens is a provincial heritage site home to a functional water wheel from 1877. The site offers workshops, a restaurant, heritage gardens, an RV campground, and lots more.

Keremeos Grist Mill, Picture BC
Keremeos Grist Mill | Picture BC

Before heading back to our campsite, we made sure to pop in at some of the many fruit stands in Keremeos.  Fresh fruit and samosas were on the menu for us and both were delightful!

Hammocking in Stemwinder Provincial Park | Kim Walker

Stemwinder Provincial Park is a great weekend or stopover destination when travelling through the Similkameen region. There is a lot to experience, whether you prefer sampling from vineyards and orchards, exploring a heritage site, or getting out for a hike such as the one at nearby French Mine (see blog).

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Camping in British Columbia’s West Kootenays: Checking out three great campsites

Camping in the West Kootenay’s is a great way to explore the area and visit communities like Nakusp and Burton.  So in July 2020, we visited three campgrounds near or on the shores of Arrow Lake and the town of Nakusp.

KBR Campground

2 km north of Nakusp lies KBR Campground with 40 campsites. This campground is in a great location for those who want to explore the area, through hiking, shopping, eating out in Nakusp, or relaxing in the hot springs across the road. A new addition this summer is their koi pond. KBR is a great location for travellers on the go.

Three Islands Resort

15 km south of Nakusp is Three Islands Resort. Located on Summit Lake, this campsite is a paradise for campers with easy access to the lake, lots of local ATV trails and very helpful owners. What we liked about this campground was the lovely beach and boat launch plus lots of choice for sites, whether you are looking for tenting, full service or lakeshore sites.

Burton Historical Park / Photo: C. Stathers

Burton Historical Park

36 km south of Nakusp is the community of Burton with its rich history. Founded in 1895, Burton was originally a gold rush town. Its destiny dramatically changed with the signing of the Columbia River Treaty (between Canada and the United States) and the building of the Keenleyside Dam in the early 1960s which controlled the flow of water in the river for hydro-electric power. This was a very traumatic time for many of the long-time residents in the area who were forced to leave or relocate when the valley was flooded.

Campsite #7 Burton Historical Park / Photo: C. Stathers

Near the original town site is the RV Park we stayed at; it is called Burton Historical Park. This park is a real gem, sitting on the shores of Arrow Lake. There are lots of sites along the lake, as well as great amenities such as hot showers, great beach access and a sani-dump. The Seniors Trail (named in honour of the local seniors group who developed it) leads from the campsite south along the lake to the site of the old cemetery.  The campsite host at the park shared with us that in the early spring when the water levels are low, you can still see remnants of the old foundations.

Burton Bean / Photo: C. Stathers

While we were camping at Burton we walked up the road to the Burton Bean, a farm stand with lots of local seasonal fruits and vegetables along with all kinds of neat treasures from local vendors and artisans. If you are looking for eggs, this is the place to go. This has to be the cutest chicken yard I have ever seen, full of happy hens!

Chicken Yard at Burton Bean / Photo: C. Stathers

A little further up the road we stopped in at Burton City Cider to try some of their local cider and their yummy pizza.

Store Sign in Burton / Photo: C. Stathers

We then meandered across the highway, to the community of Burton. Even though many of the original buildings on the lake were either burned or torn down, we walked past many that were relocated including the old general store which is now closed.

If you are looking for great camping, a beautiful part of BC and plenty of things to do, check out the Nakusp area and make it a destination for your next summer camping trip.

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If this area interests you, check out our drive:
Mountains, Lakes & Rivers in the West Kootenays and Boundary Country

For other campgrounds in this area or elsewhere in British Columbia check out the Camping Map

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Spring Has Sprung! Try Some Spring Fishing & RVing on Central Vancouver Island, BC

Fishing on the Stamp River, Port Alberni

Fishing on the Stamp River, Port Alberni. Photo: Steve Olson

Looking to bring out that fishing rod a little early this year? Here are four RV accessible campsites open year-round on central Vancouver Island located on or near a fishable lake or river. Beat the summer heat and enjoy some spring camping and fishing!

Arrowvale Riverside Campground and Cottages

Offering a traditional camping experience with over forty sites, Arrowvale Campground and Cottages in Port Alberni is ideal for a small family adventure or a large group camp-out. There are unserviced or serviced sites, with many close to the Somass River. Sproat Lake Provincial Park is a short drive away from the campground, where you can hike and fish the day away. Rainbow trout, cutthroat trout and even kokanee, a land-locked sockeye salmon, can be caught along the shore or by boat on this scenic lake.

Chemainus River Campground

Enjoy a scenic getaway at Chemainus River Campground, located on 23 acres along the Chemainus River. Soak in the views atop the river escarpment. Discover wildlife on the property, including eagles, ravens, woodpeckers, squirrels, deer and beaver. Lawn games and swimming can be found along their private beach.

Belly Boat Fishing on Fuller Lake. Photo: Verna CameronBelly Boat Fishing on Fuller Lake. Photo: Verna Cameron

Belly Boat Fishing on Fuller Lake. Photo: Verna Cameron

This campground is in a freshwater fishing hub, with Chemainus Lake, Fuller Lake and Lake Cowichan all just a stone’s throw away. Hike around Chemainus Lake to find a secret spot to catch rainbow trout, cutthroat trout and brook char from shore, or bring a belly boat to explore the lake. Fuller Lake has a dock, so you can cast for larger rainbow trout living in the cooler, deeper waters. Lake Cowichan offers fishing spots from shore and boat rentals to explore the further reaches of the lake.

Horne Lake Regional Park Campground

Don’t let the unpaved road deter you from spending a weekend at Horne Lake Regional Park, located near Qualicum Beach. Over five kilometers of riverfront and lake front RV sites are yours to enjoy and explore, almost all with a view of the water. The famous Horne Lake Caves Provincial Park is down the road from the campground and is fun for the whole family. A boat ramp, canoe and kayak rentals, a dock, and ample shore access allow anglers of all ages and abilities to spend their days on the water. Cutthroat trout, kokanee, rainbow trout and brook char can be caught year-round.

Comox Lake

Comox Lake. Photo: Mike McCulloch, BC Ministry of Forests, Lands & Natural Resource Operations

Riverside RV & Camping

Located in the beautiful Cowichan Valley, Riverside RV & Camping is a full-service RV and camping destination. The entire site is covered by treed and grassy areas, all along the world class Cowichan River. Take your pick of RV sites, as they offer full or partial hook-ups for 50 RV units and 25 tenting spots in shady or sunny spaces. If you are looking for a beautiful day trip, venture to Lake Cowichan to enjoy fishing from shore or by boat. On foot, find a quiet spot along the Cowichan River and try your luck along the river bank.

Don’t forget to purchase your licence and read and understand the Freshwater Fishing Regulations before you head out. And if you’ve never tried fishing and want to give it a try, you can borrow a rod and tackle for free from the Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC’s Vancouver Island Trout Hatchery in Duncan.

For other RV and camping accommodation go to Camping Map or Camping Search.

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The Chilliwack River Valley: An Outdoor Enthusiast’s Paradise

Chilliwack River Valley - Ken Bramble

Chilliwack River Valley – Ken Bramble

About one and a half hours east from Vancouver International Airport is one of the Lower Mainland’s best kept secrets, one which is an outdoor adventurers’ dream. Want world class fishing for steelhead trout and a variety of salmon? Got it. Rapids ranging from class 2 to 5 for the whitewater rafting rookie or experienced kayaking enthusiast? Check. A range of hikes from family-friendly afternoon jaunts to technically challenging overnighters? Affirmative. Camping destinations for relaxed RVers, summer long-weekend tenters, and backcountry machete-wielders? Absolutely. When it comes to outdoor destinations, the Chilliwack River Valley has it all. But don’t tell anyone…the locals are trying hard to keep it a secret!

Fishing near Vedder River campground

Fishing Near Vedder River Campground

With its origins in the mountains of Washington State’s North Cascades National Park, the Chilliwack River makes its way north into Canada and eventually the Chilliwack Lake. From the lake’s northern end, the river snakes mostly west for many kilometers before it meets up with the Sweltzer River and then the Sumas River before flowing into the mighty Fraser River. On a technical note, shortly after joining forces with the Sweltzer, the Chilliwack passes under the Vedder Bridge and its’ name changes to the Vedder River.

Regardless of its name, the Chilliwack/Vedder River is well known to anglers from around the Lower Mainland, the province, and even internationally. A veritable rainbow of salmon species – coho, chum, pink, white chinook, and sockeye can be caught here between the months of July and early December. The river is also home to various types of trout, including rainbow, coastal cutthroat, and steelhead, which is renowned as one of the most difficult-to-catch freshwater sportfish. Those hungry for the challenge of steelhead can put their angling skills to the test between January and April or July to early September. Be sure to obtain a proper license for the type of fish you’re hoping to hook! If you are going to camp in the area too there are a good selection of private campgrounds, provincial parks and recreation sites. More information at Where to Camp.

Chilliwack River Fishing

Fishing on Chilliwack River

If the idea of landing a 30-lb chinook salmon doesn’t thrill you, perhaps racing down the Chilliwack River in a raft or kayak would be enough to take your breath away. Local companies offer a range of trips for anyone from the rafting rookie to the whitewater junkie (from class 2 to 4+ on the whitewater scale). Perhaps you’d rather challenge the river on your own – try kayaking. There are appropriate sections for newbies, while experienced kayakers can test their skills at the famous Tamihi Rapids, Canada’s only class 5 training course and a common site for the training of our national Olympic kayaking team. By the way, the official whitewater classification system maxes out at Class 6, which is the type of water you don’t want to even attempt to navigate in a floating object (i.e. Hell’s Gate).

Camping at Lindeman Lake

Camping at Lindeman Lake

For those who feel more comfortable on “terra firma”, the Chilliwack River Valley still has plenty to offer.  Easier, flat walks can be found west of the Vedder Bridge at the Great Blue Heron Nature Reserve (several hikes ranging up to 5 km return) or the Vedder River Trails (the Vedder Rotary Trail is 8 km one way).  At the east end of the valley from Vedder Bridge is access to more moderate hikes.  The Lindeman Lake Hike is a well maintained trail that winds through forest for 3.4 km (return) with a modest 215m elevation gain before terminating at a peaceful alpine lake where wooden camping platforms are available for those who want to stay overnight.  The longer-winded among us may want to carry on a further 3.5 km and gain another 150m in elevation to visit Greendrop Lake.

View from Mt MacFarlane Summit

View from Mt MacFarlane Summit

Meanwhile, the hardier, more adventurous trekker can put their legs and lungs to the test on the way up Mount MacFarlane.  This trail will have you climbing 2,016 m over the course of 17 km out and back, but the inspiring scenery includes massive Douglas Firs, a couple of pristine lakes, and a summit with a panoramic view of snow-capped peaks that is incomparable.

Once you’ve conquered Mount MacFarlane, there are many other challenging hikes and illustrious summits to reach in the Chilliwack River Valley area. Did I mention there’s a lot to do here? If you love the outdoors, this is a place you must visit. But be careful…you might just decide you never want to leave!

For information on camping and RVing in British Columbia go to https://www.campingrvbc.com/

Roadtrekking in British Columbia’s Southern Interior

Our Roadtrek at the Rest Stop Outside Hedley
Our Roadtrek at the Rest Stop Outside Hedley

Recently we took our Roadtrek van on a camping trip “Roadtrekking” through some of the not so well-known but delightful smaller towns in the Okanagan area of the southern interior of British Columbia. The first day, we left the Vancouver area and headed up Highway 1 and the Crowsnest Hwy 3 to Princeton.  We spent the first night in the Princeton municipal park campground which has full hook-ups with free Wifi and is located right beside the Similkameen River on Highway 3. It is a great place to stop overnight. Another camping option is the Princeton golf club across the road with free Wifi and firewood for campers.

Hedley Trading Post
Hedley Trading Post

The next morning, continuing on Crowsnest Hwy 3, we headed to Keremeos, locally known as ‘the fruit capital of Canada’, and along the way visited the small, historic town of Hedley. This is well worth the stop as you can take a tour of the old Mascot Gold Mine and discover the life of a gold miner through modern technology of light and sound. You can also visit the Discovery Centre and explore the museum and gift shops. Once in Keremeos we stayed at the Eagle RV Park located on Hwy 3.

Red Bridge at Keremeos
Red Bridge at Keremeos

Much in need of some exercise after our drive, we walked the hiking/biking trail to the historic Red Bridge, the sole survivor of five covered railroad bridges that serviced the gold mining industry around the Hedley-Princeton area in the early 1900s. If you head east on the trail, it takes you to the town centre past many of the fruit stands. During the season, make sure you pick up some of the local fruit and veg to eat on your trip or to take home. Also worth a visit in Keremeos is The Grist Mill and Gardens, a BC Heritage Site.

The Artisan Shop in Oliver
The Artisan Shop in Oliver

On day 3 we headed east to the resort town of Osoyoos, a favourite destination for campers seeking beaches, swimming and boating in scenic Osoyoos Lake. We then drove north on Hwy 97 to Oliver where we stopped for lunch. On the main street we discovered a small bakery called the “Artisan Shop” run by a lovely lady from Montreal. The delicious lunch was a spinach and feta quiche, a mushroom filled bun and for desert, a pear filled danish and raspberry tart.   Oliver also has a beautiful hiking/biking trail on an abandoned railway bed which is part of the Kettle Valley Rail Trail that will take you to Osoyoos. It is about a 50 km round trip that makes a great day outing.

The Salmon Chief at Okanagan Falls
The Salmon Chief at Okanagan Falls

Continuing north through Okanagan Falls (you must stop for an icecream at Tickleberry’s) our day concluded in Peachland with an overnight stay at Todd’s RV Park located on the main road in downtown Peachland. This is a great family friendly place that has been in business for 60 years, has full hook-ups and is right across from the beach. We spent the evening strolling along the beach, investigating the shops and enjoying the beautiful view across Okanagan Lake. The next morning, we visited the Art Gallery and Tourist Information Centre located in the old school house on Beach Avenue. They have a live video feed of the bat colony that roosts in the attic every summer. There is a great selection of bat themed t-shirts, hats and they even have bat guano for sale to fertilize your garden. The next time we are in the Peachland area, we will be checking out the Stave Pipe and Trepanier hiking trails and Parrot Island sanctuary.

Sunset at Peachland opposite Todd's RV Campground
Sunset at Peachland opposite Todd’s RV Campground

After a great few days of camping, we headed home via the Hwy 97c connector that runs from Peachland to Merritt and then down the Coquihalla Hwy 5 to Hope. With so many unique towns in British Columbia we will soon be off to do more exploring in beautiful British Columbia.

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Vedder River Campground and Summer Fun, British Columbia

Vedder River is fun for the kids

Vedder River is fun for the kids

For the third year in a row, my family and I have been camping at the Vedder River Campground, located in Chilliwack, BC.  Just under an hour’s drive from downtown Vancouver, it is the perfect long weekend getaway, close yet not too close. Situated along the Vedder River, it offers an array of various activities for the whole family.  The campsite does get busy during the summer months, especially around the long weekends, therefore we make sure to book ahead of time.  There are a few families that we know that come to this campsite, and it is the perfect place for us to forget about our daily routines in the city and sit back and relax by the fire.

During the hot summer days, just steps away from the campsite is the river, a perfect cooling spot in the clean but fast flowing waters.  After breakfast my family and I would go down the river with the floaties and inflatable boats.  My kids love to go down the lazy river, although we always keep an eye on them as most of the river keeps a steady flow, but some parts of the river move more rapidly and vigorously.

Views from top of Elk Mountain, on a cloudy day we were above the clouds.

Views from top of Elk Mountain, on a cloudy day we were above the clouds.

After a full day by the water we would head back to the campsite and start preparing dinner.  Often times it would be something prepared on the Barbeque with lots of fresh salads and veggies on the side.  The kids play at the Vedder River playground, keeping busy making new friends and bike riding within the enclosed campsite area.  For a leisurely walk after dinner, or an easy bike-ride, we would take the bikes onto the Vedder South or North Dyke Trail that extend 7km, starting from the Vedder River Campground.  Surrounded by local mountains such as Mount Cheam and Elk Mountain, Chilliwack offers picturesque views and beautiful sceneries that include wild flowers, turquoise lakes and valley views.  Kids oftentimes like to visit the nearby farms to see horses and cattle feasting on hay, and pick blackberries along the way.

Going to a popular spot in Chilliwack for ice-cream at the Mighty Moose. The ice-cream is from the Birchwood Dairy Farms.

A popular spot in Chilliwack for ice-cream is the Mighty Moose made with ice-cream from Birchwood Dairy Farm

Local blueberry and strawberry farms offer berries for sale, and conveniently there is a stand located walking distance from the campsite.  We would get some freshly picked berries and make a refreshing summer berry milkshake with vanilla ice-cream as a treat. Before we head back to the city, we would buy a few flats of delicious sweet berries and make pies at home or freeze them for smoothies.

Whenever we go somewhere I encourage my family to explore local hidden spots and go for hikes to see lakes, views and waterfalls.  It is a way for us to connect without the internet

Stunning views at Lindeman Lake

Stunning views at Lindeman Lake

connection that we seem to depend on in our everyday lives.  And when we need a little more than just a hike, we would endeavour on longer adventures to see the Bridal Veil Falls, which are only a 15min drive from here.  I have yet to take my family to see the beautiful Lindeman Lake with turquoise blue waters which is about a 40 min drive from here.  A less than 3-hour hike that the whole family can do, and once there, have a picnic by the breathtaking waters surrounded by mountains.  Some parts of the trail are rockier, therefore being prepared with proper footwear and lots of water and snacks will make for a more comfortable experience.

During the early fall months, fishing becomes a popular activity along the river, as fishermen gather to catch Coho, chum, pink and sockeye salmon.  My daughter loves fishing along the river, and the expression on her face once she catches a fish is priceless.

With many activities to choose from, Chilliwack and surrounding areas offer many activities and attractions for the whole family to enjoy.  During the summer months it is a great place for making memories, having fun and enjoying the outdoors.

Hidden Waterways in British Columbia for the Hiker

There are many hidden waterways in British Columbia which offer some of the lesser known places to cool off in the water during the summer. Here are highlights of a few of the best waterways to cool off for the avid hiker.

Vancouver Island Bay off Juan de Fuca Trail by Ikiwaner

Vancouver Island Bay off Juan de Fuca Trail by Ikiwaner

Vancouver Island

San Josef Bay

Anyplace you can only reach by boat, foot, or helicopter is always less crowded, and this is one of those spots. Nestled on the northwestern point of Vancouver Island, San Josef Bay is the part of the Cape Scott Provincial Park that will most appeal to avid hikers and others who love adventure. Only 2.5 km long, it is approximately 45 minutes each way and is fun for the whole family.

The Juan de Fuca Trail

We know, that’s not a waterway! But if you hike the Juan de Fuca trail you’ll be wandering the west coast of Vancouver Island from Botanical Beach near Port Renfrew to China Beach west of Jordan River, hitting some of the best beaches along the way. You can camp out along the way too, so pack enough for several days. This trail is a wilderness trail and many sections are not for the faint of heart.

Vancouver Area

Lynn Headwaters Regional Park by Philippe Giabbanelli

Lynn Headwaters Regional Park by Philippe Giabbanelli

Norvan Falls Trail

This 12 kilometer round trip hike is part of the Lynn Headwaters Regional Park. Lynn Canyon itself is a popular spot, but the Norvan Falls Trail makes its way through an old forestry area and is easily missed. You are likely to see more rusting carts and abandoned tools from the old logging days than groups of people on this trail, and it is very peaceful. After you make it across the steel suspension bridge, you know you’ve almost reached Norvan Falls.

Okanagan

BX Falls near Vernon by Andrew Enns

BX Falls near Vernon by Andrew Enns

BX Creek and Falls

This is a great day trip, whether you’re interested in enjoying the scenic natural beauty of the Vernon area, enjoy some gold rush history, or just hoping to cool off in the wilderness. This hike takes you through a wade in a waterfall pool and into the cool canyon filled with firs, ferns, cottonwoods, cedars, and birch.

Kootenay Rockies

Lake O’Hara by GeoffL

Lake O’Hara by GeoffL

Lake O’Hara

This is a reservations only spot for campers in Yoho National Park, and it’s not so easy to find. Hike in from the trailhead which is about 12 kilometers east of Field. Making a reservation at the campground is necessary as there are only 30 campsites, but the stunning natural beauty of the emerald lake and the remote trails winding through the forests are worth it. “Yoho” itself means awe and wonder in Cree, if that tells you anything.

Northern British Columbia – Yellowhead Highway 16

Ancient Forest

Ancient Forest

Ancient Forest, Fraser River, McBride

If a quiet hike next to a winding river through a thousand-year-old cedar forest sounds like a hidden gem to you, we agree, and this is a perfect spot for you. The Fraser River and the ancient forest next to it is on the route to McBride about 113 kilometers east of Prince George. There’s no fanfare here, just a sign off Highway 16 that’s easily missed that will take you to the trailhead parking area. The Ancient Forest Trail is only 2.5 kilometers long and wheelchair accessible, but with untouched growth of trees up to 16 meters around, it’s definitely worth a hike.

Nechako Reservoir, Quanchus Range, Tweedsmuir Provincial Park

You might want to skip the two popular hiking areas in Tweedsmuir Provincial Park, the Hunlen Falls/Turner Lake Chain and the Rainbow Range Trail. Instead, check out the truly remote north half of the park, in the Quanchus Range. You can only access this portion of the park by float plane, as it is nearly surrounded by the Nechako Reservoir, ensuring that it stays hidden from most. And remember, you need to either have a professional guide or be completely self-sufficient to hack the Quanchus Range.

Queen Charlotte Islands

East Beach Trail, Haida Gwaii

The remote East Beach Trail, in Naikoon Provincial Park on Haida Gwaii is 90 kilometers long, a 4 to 6 day moderate level hike winding along the eastern shoreline of Graham Island. For the best weather, move from Tlell in the south up to Tow Hill near Masset in the north. Expect rain, wind, and the need to cross rivers—and watch out for black bears! If you need them you’ll find several shelters along the way.

Northern British Columbia – Alaska Highway 97

Muncho Lake by Kelly Donaldson

Muncho Lake by Kelly Donaldson

Mineral Licks Trail, Muncho Lake

One of the easier hikes on this list, you’ll still get stunning views, lots of wildlife, and gorgeous Muncho Lake following the Mineral Licks Trail. This short two-hour hike covers about 1.3 kilometers in a loop. Watch for animals including sheep licking the rocks and soil for the minerals in them.

Conclusion

Have we sold you on hiking some of BC’s lesser known spots yet? There are so many hidden adventures here to discover and enjoy. If you love hiking in the wilderness but hate the summer crowds, one of these great trips might be perfect for you. Watch for our next installment in the hidden gem waterways series on the best hidden spots for the wildlife enthusiast.

Go to Hidden Gem Waterways for Fishing in British Columbia for the first installment.

Rafting on the Elaho River in Squamish, BC

river rafts on Elaho River

Rafts on the bank of the Elaho River, Squamish BC

When the sun is beating down as it has been in BC for the last few weeks, the only thing you want to be near is cool, refreshing water.

Not one for being idle, I’ve found the best remedy (more…)

Published: July 31st, 2013

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